Bowdoin Classmates Antholis and Putnam Team Up For ‘Olive Kitteridge’ Sneak Peak (Boston Globe)

OliveKitteridgeHBO President of Miniseries Kary Antholis ’84 teamed up with his Bowdoin classmate and JFK Library Director Thomas Putnam ’84 Tuesday evening to treat Bostonians and several visiting Mainers—including Bowdoin Dean for Academic Affairs Cristle Collins Judd—to a preview of the upcoming HBO miniseries “Olive Kitteridge.”

The event—held at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum in Boston—was also attended by Harpswell resident and author Elizabeth Strout (Bates College Class of 1977), whose novel, “Olive Kitteridge” won the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. The series based on the novel premieres on HBO on Sunday, November 2.

New Research Vessel Joins the Bowdoin Coastal Studies Fleet

R/V A.O.K.With big expansions underway in Coastal Studies facilities and programming, Bowdoin has made a valuable acquisition: the R/V A.O.K., a 28-foot research vessel with a twin outboard hull.

Donated anonymously to the College, this new resource “has really increased our ability to get students to a variety of study sites, including offshore,” said David Carlon, director of the Coastal Studies Center and its newly renovated Marine Lab.

“We’ve set the boat up with a winch to deploy and retrieve sampling gear, and there’s a special rail on the back so we can run nets and dredges over the outboard motors,” Carlon said. “There’s also quite a bit of deck space on the boat – we can bring a class of eight to ten students aboard.”

Carlon, along with Coastal Studies staff Mark Murray and Marko Melendy, piloted the vessel from Yarmouth Boat Yard (in Yarmouth, Maine) to its new home at Orr’s Island. See a slideshow of the trip.

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What One Man Found When He Liked Everything on Facebook (Wired)

facebook-logo256After liking everything that came up in his newsfeed for 48 straight hours, Mat Honan found, surprisingly, a whole lot of content that he disliked. There is a specific type of Facebook content “designed to get you to interact,” he explains. “And if you take the bait, you’ll be shown it ad nauseam.” When viewed on his computer, he still saw some posts from his friends — but on his mobile, human content disappeared entirely, replaced on the first day with content from “Huffington Post, Upworthy, Huffington Post, Upworthy, a Levi’s ad, Space.com, Huffington Post, Upworthy, The Verge, Huffington Post, Space.com, Upworthy, Space.com.” And this was just the beginning of the repercussions. Honan’s experiment lasted only 48 hours because he couldn’t stand it anymore.