Joshua Chamberlain’s Dueling Medals of Honor on Display July 2

The original Medal of Honor (left) awarded to Civil War general Joshua Chamberlain was donated to the Pejepscot Historical Society in Brunswick, and the updated Medal of Honor given to Joshua Chamberlain (right), redesigned in 1904, and held by the George J. Mitchell Department of Special Collections & Archives at Bowdoin .College

The original Medal of Honor (left) awarded to Civil War general Joshua Chamberlain was donated to the Pejepscot Historical Society in Brunswick, and the updated Medal of Honor given to Joshua Chamberlain (right), redesigned in 1904, and held by the George J. Mitchell Department of Special Collections & Archives at Bowdoin College.

A rare reunion is set to take place Wednesday, July 2, as Civil War general Joshua Chamberlain’s original Medal of Honor, owned by the Pejepscot Historical Society, will be displayed alongside its redesigned replacement, owned by the College. The exhibition of the two medals takes place between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. at the Joshua L. Chamberlain Museum in Brunswick.

Representatives from Brunswick’s Post Office will be on site at the Chamberlain Museum 3-5 p.m. to sell Medal of Honor stamps and offer a special one-day-only Chamberlain pictorial cancellation.

The cancellation, designed by Pejepscot Historical Society and approved by the United States Postal Service, celebrates Chamberlain’s distinguished service in the Civil War and the 151st anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, for actions at which Chamberlain received his own Medal of Honor.

Performers from Maine State Music Theatre will be on hand singing standards. Throughout the day on July 2, guests showing ticket stubs from Maine State Music Theatre’s performance of “Chamberlain: A Civil War Romance” will receive 50% off admission at the Chamberlain Museum. “Chamberlain: A Civil War Romance” runs June 25 through July 12. A short program will take place at 3:30 pm. More on the history of the medals here.

2 comments to Joshua Chamberlain’s Dueling Medals of Honor on Display July 2

  • jon joseph class of '70

    A GREAT man. But after the Union’s victory the Feds pulled occupying troops out far too soon and delivered our black brothers and sisters into apartheid.

    Perhaps it would have been better to allow the South to split and end slavery as a result of new technology? If this War had not been fought we would have 30 million more Euro-Americans and 10 million more Afro-Americans extant in our Nation today.

    Our Nation is great at winning wars and losing the peace.

  • The South’s goal was to expand slavery into the new territories. If the North let the South secede there would still be battles fought over the new territories. Slavery wasn’t about to go anywhere soon. Yes reconstruction failed and it took another 100 years to regain equal rights, but at least slavery was dead, at least we were one country who could work it out together. If you want to wish for things, wish that the South had never seceded, then slavery would have had its slow death that you wish for and those people you speak of will be extant as part of our Nation today, rather than as part of a nation to our south.

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