Slideshow: Bowdoin Students Rescue Other Students Injured in ‘Copter Crash and Other (Fake) Disasters

Over the course of an intensive eight-day workshop, which took place over the past two weeks, 41 Bowdoin students who aspire to lead outing club trips learned wilderness first-aid. Taught by instructors from Wilderness Medical Associates International, the Wilderness First Responder course covered hypothermia, heatstroke, broken limbs, head trauma, burns, spinal injuries, lacerations, heart attacks, and difficult and panicky patients. Once the students are WFR certified, they can lead any number of student trips, on land or on sea.

Photos by Michele Stapleton

A happy student before a simulated helicopter crash, which supposedly took place in a remote town in Manitoba

A happy student before a simulated helicopter crash, which supposedly took place in a remote town in Manitoba

The injured pilot, who also must convince his responders he's intoxicated

The injured pilot, who also must convince his responders he's intoxicated

Wilderness Medical Associates Instructor Eric Duffy applies make-up to the injured passengers

Wilderness Medical Associates Instructor Eric Duffy applies make-up to the injured passengers

Some have severe burns on their hands

Some have severe burns on their hands

Eric Duffy applies hand sanitizer to make the tissue (i.e. peeling skin) stick

Eric Duffy applies hand sanitizer to make the tissue (i.e. peeling skin) stick

This student has numerous injuries, plus is knocked out in the crash

This student has numerous injuries, plus is knocked out in the crash

Besides a major head wound, this passenger has dislocated her shoulder and hurt her ankle

Besides a major head wound, this passenger has dislocated her shoulder and hurt her ankle

The helicopter passengers land in a pigpile after the crash

The helicopter passengers land in a pigpile after the crash

The wilderness first responders are on the scene. Here a burn victim is being treated.

The wilderness first responders are on the scene. Here a burn victim is being treated.

Treating a head wound to a finally complacent patient

Treating a head wound to a finally complacent patient

A first-aid responder stabilizes the pilot

A first-aid responder stabilizes the pilot

Student responders gingerly care for their patient

Student responders gingerly care for their patient

One of the first steps is to slide a patient onto a stretcher

One of the first steps is to slide a patient onto a stretcher

All bandaged up and feeling better

All bandaged up and feeling better

An instructor helps check the pulse of a patient

An instructor helps check the pulse of a patient

Rebecca-22

Rebecca-22

Responders keep track of vital signs

Responders keep track of vital signs

A happy student before a simulated helicopter crash, which supposedly took place in a remote town in ManitobaThe injured pilot, who also must convince his responders he's intoxicatedWilderness Medical Associates Instructor Eric Duffy applies make-up to the injured passengersSome have severe burns on their handsEric Duffy applies hand sanitizer to make the tissue (i.e. peeling skin) stickThis student has numerous injuries, plus is knocked out in the crashBesides a major head wound, this passenger has dislocated her shoulder and hurt her ankleThe helicopter passengers land in a pigpile after the crashThe wilderness first responders are on the scene. Here a burn victim is being treated.Treating a head wound to a finally complacent patientA first-aid responder stabilizes the pilotStudent responders gingerly care for their patientOne of the first steps is to slide a patient onto a stretcherAll bandaged up and feeling betterAn instructor helps check the pulse of a patientRebecca-22Responders keep track of vital signs

Comments

  1. Eva Murray says:

    As an EMT and Wilderness First Responder myself, and the mother of a current Bowdoin student, and a survivor of an aviation wreck who had actual facial injuries not too unlike those simulated above, I am extremely proud of these Bowdoin student responders! Thank you so much for taking this training and offering your time, strength, knowledge and compassion!

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